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Old Is Gold

While I was picking teams for various tournaments – boy, do we have a lot of cricket happening or what - I was analyzing the basis on which I select players for the lineup. The other blog of mine had the following points
  • Study the player. Figure out what conditions and what pitch they are familiar and comfortable with. 
  • Study the location of the tournament along with the pitch condition. Compare them with the players. Pick the ones that you find would be compatible. Pitch condition will also help you predict how the team batting first is likely to perform
  • The points given to the players during the various tournaments are a big clue.The better he plays, the more the points credited to him. 
  • Pick from a list of consistent players as opposed to risking with new players.
  • A bowler who bowls in the death overs, as well as those who are placed higher up in the batting order, are likely to earn you points with both the bat as well as the ball.
  • Study the percentage of selection as shown on the app. This represents the number of people who want him on their fantasy lineup. This is taken into consideration under the presumption that the mass cannot be wrong. 
  • Study the points that the player has earned in the previous matches of the tournament. This, you can find in the completed section. 
  • Check for any possible injuries. Follow the player on our app and get notifications about him.

Now, these points are fairly logical. And based on pure statistics. They are not opinion-driven factors. What you see is what you get here. There is very little chance of disagreement or contradictions. Having said that, I realized that personally, and subconsciously, I pick players who have played for a long time and have earned the reputation of being able to single-handedly lead their team to victory.
So when questions are raised to the likes of Dhoni, asking him if he is thinking of post-retirement plans, I am positively speechless. When Yuvraj Singh and Suresh Raina recently failed the endurement tests and were temporarily removed from the teams until they can prove that they are fit, that sounds like a good way to decide if one should be on the team or not. Or say, consistent and consecutive single-digit scores for over five matches. But just because Dhoni has reached a certain age, he should not be subject to such questions.
A certain respected person then compared him to Agassi saying that if the tennis player could start winning Grand Slams at the age of 36, Dhoni can still do it.  It is a very valid point. But doesn’t it sound like he was defending Dhoni? Why should things come to this point where we have to defend such a player who has on many occasions proven his right to be in the national team?
Virat Kohli recently said that the bench was very strong, so if the players cannot keep up, they are out. He never mentioned 36. That is what is needed.
Old is really gold, in my opinion. These players have a lot to offer to the young side. With state league tournaments such as TNPL taking off big time and audiences, fans and players are being reached at the grassroot level, the district and national teams are likely to become stronger than ever. This does not rule out the importance of the players who have reached a ‘certain age’.
Let the player play in peace. And retire in peace. The last thing he wants is pressure and his confidence getting affected.

Let the numbers talk. Yes. Only those that are essential to picking the team. Not age.
What do you think?

Indu

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